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Education

About the Feijoa


Feijoas are originally from South America (Brazil, Paraguay, Uraguay) and were brought to New Zealand in the 1920s. Because few of their original pests followed them from South America, Feijoas are easily grown organically and naturally in New Zealand. In fact, Tauroa Farm, where our feijoas are grown, is a haven for birds and biodiversity. It is the birds that pollinate feijoa flowers. When eating the sweet, pink petals the birds distribute the pollen. 

 The short growing season and lack of processing has traditionally limited feijoas to being enjoyed in the country in which they are grown. New processing and freezing techniques now make it possible to take feijoas further afield. That means many more people can enjoy their unique flavour and amazing nutritional benefits. 
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The nutritional benefits of Feijoas

If you’re looking for a way to increase the nutritional impact of your food, then Feijoas are an excellent solution.

Research has found, and continues to find, that the Feijoa has amazing bioactive properties. These compounds are shown to have anti-microbial, antifungal, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunity stimulating benefits*. 

The high level of beneficial compounds mean that feijoa extracts are a focus for the health industry. Researchers are now recognising the likely future benefit of owning patents in these potent products.
feijoas

Good for the gut

Did you know that feijoas are almost as high in fibre as the avocado? Fibre has the benefit of not only keeping you regular, but also helping to fuel good bacteria in your gut.
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The power of potassium

Feijoas sit somewhere between bananas and oranges in terms of potassium levels. Potassium is one of the electrolytes that regulate muscle function and help to keep the blood flowing.
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We pick the best Feijoas

At Heather's Feijoas, we only pick tree-ripened feijoas. The fruit takes about 120 days to develop. Around day 90 the fruit accumulates sugars and acids and rapidly grows in size.

Unlike kiwifruit and apples, the feijoa does not accumulate much starch, and is therefore unable to convert starch to sugar once picked. That means feijoas have to be picked ripe for maximum sweetness and flavour and the best nutritional value.

The short growing season and lack of processing has traditionally limited feijoas to being enjoyed in the country in which they are grown. New processing and freezing techniques now make it possible to take feijoas further afield.
Feijoas (Acca selawena) are in the myrtle family, the same family as the New Zealand Rata and Pohutakawa.

That means many more people can enjoy their unique flavour and amazing nutritional benefits.

The flavour of feijoa is so unique it is hard to describe. If you had to compare it perhapsthey taste like a combination of several other fruits, usually described as pineapple, guava, and strawberry and very fragrant, with sweet and tart aspects.
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Feijoas are NOT Pineapple Guavas

Feijoas have been nicknamed the Pineapple Guava but there is another fruit in the guava family more aptly named pineapple guava. It is smaller, yellow and has larger seeds. Feijoas (Acca selawena) are in the myrtle family, the same family as the New Zealand Rata and Pohutakawa.


*Source: Feijoa Fruit, Mercedes C. Argüelles and Ronald Ross Watson.